Archives for the month of: January, 2014

Colon Polyps – Treatment Overview

Heniford’s research team identified more than 120,000 colonoscopies performed between June 2003 and October 2011 in patients ages 20 to 90. Of the polyps removed during these procedures, 72,960 had an identifiable location. “This is one of the largest studies to date, if not the largest, that used colonoscopy to find where colorectal polyps most often originate and at what age,” Dr. Heniford said. Although the greatest percentage of polyps (25.5 percent) came from the sigmoid colon, the researchers found that the predominant site for polyps differed with increasing age. Compared with patients 60 or younger, patients older than 60 were 1.6 times more likely to have a right-sided colon polyp, where colonoscopybut not sigmoidoscopycould detect it, Dr. Heniford reported. The results reportedly did not differ between men and women.Dr. Heniford said the age difference was similar for the type of polyp that most often becomes cancerous (adenomatous) but was less pronounced for nondangerous polyps. For each decade of age, the odds ratio of finding polyps in the sigmoid colon was 0.88 compared with 1.22 for the cecum at the beginning of the colon, and 1.30 for the ascending or right side of the colon above the cecum. Therefore, in a 70-year-old patient, a polyp would be about 2.5 times more likely to originate in the cecum or ascending colon compared with a 50-year-old patient, Dr.

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U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry looks out at the Swiss Alps during a helicopter ride from Davos to Zurich January 25, 2014. REUTERS/Gary Cameron

Colon cancer risk factors The lifetime risk for developing colon cancer is 1-in-18 and over 90% of these cases occur after the age 50. Increasing age, a family history of colon polyps, colon cancer or other early cancers can double or triple your risk for developing this disease. If any of these risk factors run in your family, you need to start the discussion about screening at age 40 or even earlier depending on when your family members were diagnosed. Persons with ulcerative colitis , Crohns disease or a personal history of cancer are also at increased risk for colon cancer and need to tailor regular, more frequent colonoscopies. Studies also indicate that diet and smoking may increase the risk of developing colon polyps and colon cancer. While family history and other risk factors matter, not having risk factors does not eliminate your need for screenings. What polyps tell us As we age, about 1-in-4 of us develop polyps in our colon and about 10% of these polyps eventually turn from a benign growth into colon cancer. For the most part, these polyps take about 10 years to transform into colon cancer. Polyps and early colon cancers often have no symptoms and can be detected only by screening exams. How can colon cancer best be prevented? There are several effective ways to reduce your colon cancer risk, but none more important than getting timely screenings and removing polyps before they become malignant. Refraining from smoking, maintaining healthy weight and regular exercise, managing normal body levels of nutrients, especially vitamin D also appear to lower risk factors. Diets high in fiber are good for you, but have not been definitively shown to reduce colon cancer risk. What are the symptoms of colon cancer? Symptoms usually occur once tumors are advanced and causing obstruction or if the cancer has spread beyond the colon there may be rectal bleeding, anemia, abdominal pain, a change in bowel habits (constipation or diarrhea ), unexplained weight loss, loss of appetite, recurrent fevers, unexplained nausea or vomiting, or fatigue.

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Colon Cancer and Polyps: What You Need to Know

Cancer Cells

These polyps do not become cancerous. In this case you can continue your regular screenings, unless you are at an increased risk for colon cancer because of a family history of colon cancer or an inherited polyp syndrome. Risks of removing polyps during colonoscopy Complications from colonoscopy are rare. There is a slight risk of: Puncturing the colon (less than 1 in 1,000) or causing severe bleeding by damaging the wall of the colon (less than 3 in 1,000). Bleeding caused by removing a polyp. Complications from sedatives given during the procedure. Ongoing treatment Regular screenings for colon polyps are the best way to prevent polyps from developing into colon cancer. Most colon polyps can be identified and removed during a colonoscopy. If you have had one or more adenomatous polyps removed, you probably need regular follow-up colonoscopy exams every 3 to 5 years. Talk with your doctor about the follow-up schedule that he or she thinks is best for you. Treatment if the condition gets worse Surgery is sometimes needed for large colon polyps that have a broad area of attachment ( sessile polyps ) to the colon wall. These large polyps sometimes cannot be removed safely during a colonoscopy and may be more likely to develop into cancer. If cancer is found when the colon polyps are examined, you will begin treatment for colorectal cancer .

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While many inhibitors have successfully eradicated cancer cells, a mutated form of that cancer almost always returns, and is usually more resilient and faster growing. Dr. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins, who instigated the investigation of the 28 colon cancer patients, enlisted the help of mathematician Martin Nowak and his team to create a mathematical model of how the colon cancer cells were reacting to the inhibitor panitumumab. Nowak’s findings were illuminating: they showed that as the cancer cells rapidly reproduced, various mutations would inevitably occur. Some of those mutations would show resistance to the inhibitor drug, and although that resistant pool was less than 1%, it quickly evolved to tumor capacity. In fact, even before treatment began, Nowak and his team found one in a million cells to carry resistant mutations and could also quickly evolve to tumor level. Up to now, doctors and clinical trials have been testing inhibitor drugs in sequence to one another: if one fails due to resistance, a new one is applied to fight it. “The problem with this sequential approach,” Jeffrey Epstein remarked, “is that new resistance is guaranteed to occur to the second drug.” “The second one fails for the same reason as the first one,” Martin Nowak asserted to the New York Times . Based on this, Dr. Vogelstein and Dr. Nowak concluded that a cocktail of inhibitor drugs must be used to target all possible mutations. The challenge however is daunting: there are few, if any clinical trials that offer inhibitor combinations, mutation analysis within a cancer needs to be improved and toxicity tolerance better evaluated. Health Care Industry DENVER (AP) The federal government is ready to let farmers grow cannabis at least the kind that can’t get people high.

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Colon Cancer Prevention

Colon Cancer Screening Options Early-stage colon cancer usually begins as a polyp, a growth that protrudes from the colon wall. Regular screening tests can detect and remove polyps before they become cancerous, which is why they are recommended for people over age 50 and those at high risk of developing colon cancer. There is more than one type of colon cancer screening test, so talk to your doctor about which one is right for you. Learn about colon cancer screening . Kick the Habit, Prevent Colon Cancer Most people associate smoking with lung cancer, but surprisingly, cigarettes are also tied to colon cancer. Smokers not only have a higher risk of developing colon cancer, they are also at greater risk of dying from this disease. And although it’s never too late to kick the habit, experts say that smoking in your teens and 20s is strongly linked to colon cancer. Get the facts on smoking and colon cancer risk . Genetic Screening and Colon Cancer What’s your family history of colon cancer? If you have more than one relative with colon polyps or colon cancer, genetic testing might be a good idea. Depending on the results, your doctor may recommend starting colon cancer screening at an earlier age. You may also want to pay closer attention to dietary and exercise guidelines for colon cancer prevention. Decide whether genetic colon cancer testing is right for you.

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Factors your doctor may consider There are several factors that your doctor should consider when recommending the best course of treatment for you. This includes your general health and stage of the disease, which is determined in part by the extent to which the cancer has spread. Your doctor may also consider how aggressive your disease is or how quickly it appears to be progressing, and if it requires symptomatic relief. Additionally, he or she may do a test to determine the BRAF status of your tumor. The test would determine if your tumor contains a mutated BRAF gene, which is found in about half of all metastatic melanoma patients. In addition to the physical considerations for treatment, it is also important to discuss your treatment goals. When I meet with a patient who has recently been diagnosed with metastatic melanoma, our conversation about treatment goals is one of the most important talks we have, says Henry Koon, M.D., UH Seidman Cancer Center, Cleveland, OH. I take time to discuss with my patients the factors that ultimately help determine which treatment is best for them. Overview of treatment options Among the options your doctor may recommend are surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, immunotherapy or targeted therapy. He or she may also suggest that you enroll in a clinical trial. Chemotherapy involves drugs that travel through the bloodstream to kill cancer cells and may be taken orally or injected into the vein. Immunotherapy works by boosting the bodys own immune system to fight cancer. Typically, when viruses or bacteria enter the body, the immune system can recognize and neutralize them.

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The report also concludes that second-hand smoking could cause strokes for nonsmokers. The Health Consequences of Smoking -50 Years of Progress was released Friday in honor of the landmark 1964 Surgeon General report that officially tied cigarette smoking to lung cancer. Since the first report was published 50 years ago, more than 20 million Americans have died because of smoking. The new report concludes that cigarette smoking kills nearly half a million Americans per year. If the current rates continue, approximately 5.6 million children one out of every 13 alive today will die prematurely of smoking-related causes, according to the report. In a press conference Friday morning, Acting Surgeon General Dr. Boris Lushniak explained that smokers today have a greater risk of developing lung cancer than smokers did 50 years ago. Even though todays smokers consume fewer cigarettes than those half a century ago, the changes in design and composition of cigarettes since the 1950s have increased the risk. How cigarettes are made and the chemicals they contain have changed over the years and some of those changes may be a factor in higher lung cancer risks, said Lushniak. At least 70 of the chemicals in cigarette smoke are carcinogens and the levels of some of these chemicals have increased as manufacturing processes have changed. Lushniak suggested current tobacco control measures, like price increases and indoor-smoking bans, stay in place since they have proven effective. Enough is enough! Enough is enough! he said. The number of Americans who smoke cigarettes has declined from 42 percent in 1965 to 18 percent in 2012, and tobacco control saved about 8 million lives over the past 50 years.

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Change in Leadership at the Colon Cancer Coalition

“Those patients bleeding will miss real blood, and those not bleeding will report ‘blood’ in the toilet mistakenly,” Nash said. Colon cancer, or colorectal cancer, develops in the cells that line the large intestine (colon) or rectum. The condition caused about 50,000 deaths in the United States in 2013, according to the National Cancer Institute, and many people suffer few symptoms early on. [ 10 Do’s and Don’ts to Reduce Your Risk of Cancer ] Nash said he saw what looked like blood in his own toilet, but it turned out to be red hearts adorning the bathroom tissue. He said manufacturers and the public should be aware of this risk. “In my view, it is irresponsible of the makers to have not considered this,” Nash told LiveScience in an email, adding that inks of other colors would not create this difficulty. Not all medical professionals view it as a concern, however. “I think it’s nonsense,” said Dr. David Bernstein, a gastroenterologist at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. Bernstein said he has never seen a patient who confused colored toilet paper with signs of colon cancer. “If someone sees blood, they should call their doctor, not panic, and have it appropriately evaluated,” Nash said. He also said healthy people should have regular colonoscopies , which are widely recommended as a screening tool for colorectal cancer. Bloody stool is much more commonly associated with hemorrhoids than colon cancer, both doctors said.

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Toilet Paper Could Hide a Cancer Warning Sign, Doc Says

Anne Carlson remains executive director. “I am excited and encouraged,” said Lindquist. “Both Anne and Jeff exemplify dedication that comes from their hearts as survivors of cancer. They share a passion to grow the organization.” “We thank Kristin for her vision 10 years ago to start an organization dedicated to the education and screening for colon cancer,” said Jeff Smedsrud. “I am excited to take the organization she started and work with Anne Carlson and the staff to continue its growth into the future.” A colon cancer survivor himself, Jeff Smedsrud was diagnosed in 2003 at the age of 44. Promoting colon cancer awareness has been a passion for him ever since. He has run marathons around throughout the world, including all seven continents. Smedsrud is the president of HealthCare.com, Inc. and serves on the board of several regional health care organizations. 2014 will be an exciting year of growth and change for the Colon Cancer Coalition. A new logo and website will be rolled out in February and the Coalition looks to host over 45 Get Your Rear in Gear events (a 25% increase over 2013), including ten new host cities and several returning events. About the Colon Cancer Coalition / Get Your Rear in Gear The Colon Cancer Coalition is a non-profit organization based in Minneapolis.

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They checked the biopsies and they said hey, you have stage four colon cancer, David Chirinos said. The cancer had spread to David’s liver and his lungs; the treatment was brutal. They had to wheel him down to the radiation room every single day it was basement of the hospital. He couldn’t even stand; he could barely sit up, Sarah said. After the radiation, surgery and chemotherapy, he was cancer free. Then it came back. That meant more radiation, surgery and chemotherapy. And then there was finally another period of remission. Now David’s cancer has returned for a third time, hes back to getting regular chemotherapy treatments again. David receives a full pension through his medical discharge from the Marines; but his wife has had to go on un-paid leave. And the bills for the mortgage, food and gas for his weekly trips to the hospital from their home in Baltimore County continue to pile up. That’s why this weekend friends and family are hosting a bull and shrimp roast to raise money . We are incredibly thankful for all of the generosity. We never thought that we’d have this many people interested in helping us, Sarah said.

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Colon Cancer and Polyps: What You Need to Know

Cancer Cells

When found early, colon cancer is approximately 90% treatable. Colon cancer risk factors The lifetime risk for developing colon cancer is 1-in-18 and over 90% of these cases occur after the age 50. Increasing age, a family history of colon polyps, colon cancer or other early cancers can double or triple your risk for developing this disease. If any of these risk factors run in your family, you need to start the discussion about screening at age 40 or even earlier depending on when your family members were diagnosed. Persons with ulcerative colitis , Crohns disease or a personal history of cancer are also at increased risk for colon cancer and need to tailor regular, more frequent colonoscopies. Studies also indicate that diet and smoking may increase the risk of developing colon polyps and colon cancer. While family history and other risk factors matter, not having risk factors does not eliminate your need for screenings. What polyps tell us As we age, about 1-in-4 of us develop polyps in our colon and about 10% of these polyps eventually turn from a benign growth into colon cancer. For the most part, these polyps take about 10 years to transform into colon cancer. Polyps and early colon cancers often have no symptoms and can be detected only by screening exams. How can colon cancer best be prevented? There are several effective ways to reduce your colon cancer risk, but none more important than getting timely screenings and removing polyps before they become malignant. Refraining from smoking, maintaining healthy weight and regular exercise, managing normal body levels of nutrients, especially vitamin D also appear to lower risk factors. Diets high in fiber are good for you, but have not been definitively shown to reduce colon cancer risk. What are the symptoms of colon cancer? Symptoms usually occur once tumors are advanced and causing obstruction or if the cancer has spread beyond the colon there may be rectal bleeding, anemia, abdominal pain, a change in bowel habits (constipation or diarrhea ), unexplained weight loss, loss of appetite, recurrent fevers, unexplained nausea or vomiting, or fatigue.

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Novel screening strategies for colorectal cancer

Doctors discovered a large tumor had caused the collapse. And that wasn’t the end of the bad news. You just don’t expect a man in his young 40s, who was perfectly healthy in every other way, to get this kind of diagnosis. Mike Robertson, Hayes’ manager The cancer had metastasized, or spread. Surgeons removed approximately 70% of Hayes’ liver and more than 20 inches of his large intestine. “You just don’t expect a man in his young 40s, who was perfectly healthy in every other way, to get this kind of diagnosis,” says Hayes’ manager, Mike Robertson. “There was a part of me that was going, ‘Surely this can’t be happening.’ ” Colorectal cancer — often referred to as colon cancer — is the third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society . It’s also the most preventable. Colorectal cancer usually develops slowly, over the course of 10 to 15 years, from noncancerous polyps. Approximately 90% of new cases occur in people over the age of 50. The American Cancer Society recommends colonoscopies every 10 years for people beginning at that age, unless they have high risk factors such as a family history of colorectal cancer or another gastrointestinal disease. Colonoscopies can spot and remove polyps before they become malignant. Coming clean about my first colonoscopy “Oftentimes, [colorectal cancer] has no symptoms,” says Dr.

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Stage IV Colon Cancer Prognosis

Furthermore, if they do already have cancer, it is likely you are going to pick up the early form of the cancerous growth before it spreads beyond the bowel walls. Levels: There are basic grading systems to assess the severity of the cancer. If it is still within the bowel wall, it is classified as Dukes A or B; if it has spread to the lymph glands, its a C and if it has spread to distant organs such as the liver, lungs, bones, brain etc., then its a D. So screening has become a very important clinical service in Nigeria and West Africa. In the western world, it is a phenomenon that is taken as a way of life so people within specific ages undergo screening methods to try and identify the early forms of the disease to save lives, said Obichere. Screening methods: There are different methods of screening but we have not quite identified that absolute holy grail. In other words, what single test, or what single stool or blood test that we can carry out that will say yes, Mr. A or Mr. B has colon cancer that is conclusive. There are current techniques that are good such as Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) where we basically are testing for blood in stool. The presence of blood in your stool does not mean that you have cancer, it means that you probably need further investigations to identify the cause of bleeding. There is Barium enema which is quite common in Nigeria. It is still very popular in the third world because it is cheap and simple to administer but many patients find it intolerable so it has largely been abandoned as a form of screening in the western world. Modern screening methods: Colonoscopy Direct visualisation of the entire large intestine using fibre-optic flexible telescopes remains the gold standard.

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Wade Hayes performs at the Stars Go Blue For Colon Cancer benefit on March 6, 2012.

Thanks to the introduction of CRC screening programs, mortality in the developed countries is falling; however incidence continues to rise as a result of diet and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. While historically, colorectal cancer incidence in the developing world is low, in recent years, disease diagnosis rates have dramatically increased, as a result of changing lifestyles, awareness and improved access to medical services. CRC screening can improve survival rates, and reduce the overall cost of patient treatment. The value of the in-vitro CRC screening test market in Brazil was calculated to be worth $6.9m in 2012, and is expected to grow with a CAGR of 3.09% by 2019. The main drivers for the increase in testing are the increase in the population of people likely to benefit from CRC screening. GlobalData expects that as CRC screening DNA tests become more widely known after FDA PMA is issued in late 2013 or early 2014, then more physicians in Brazil will recommend this screening test to patients, as an alternative to FOB testing and screening colonoscopies. Scope – An overview of colorectal cancer, which includes epidemiology, etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, pathology and treatment guidelines. – Annualized South America in-vitro colorectal cancer screening tests market revenue and future forecasts from 2010 to 2012, forecast for 7 years to 2019. – Investigation of current and future market competition for in-vitro colorectal cancer screening tests. – Insightful review of the key industry drivers, restraints and challenges as well as predicted impact of key events. – Competitor assessment including device approval analysis and device sales forecasts. – Marketed and pipeline product profiles covering efficiency, safety, clinical study details, device approvals, product positioning and device sales forecast. – Analysis of unmet needs within the market and opportunities for future players. – Technology trends evaluation to assess strength of pipeline. – An overview of all devices in development including clinical study details, design and material selection considerations, efficacy reports, and device approval timelines. – Company profiles including business description, financial overview and SWOT analysis.

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MediPoint: In-Vitro Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests – South America Analysis and Market Forecasts

They estimate 26,580 of the deaths will be men and 24,790 will be women. You Might Also Like Herbs for Late Stage Significance The prognosis for people with colon cancer depends on whether the cancer has penetrated through the layers of the bowel, whether there are lymph nodes involved and whether the cancer has spread to distant organs. In stage IV, all three of these situations are present. That means that people diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer may receive treatment that is a little different from those diagnosed in earlier stages. Treatment Recurrence of the disease is a major factor in treating people with stage IV colon cancer. Surgery may be recommended if there are few distant metastases that are small enough to remove with the colon cancer in order to help the person live longer. For advanced stage IV cancer, surgery might be recommended to relieve or prevent a blockage and help you be more comfortable. Chemotherapy is frequently the first treatment method used in an effort to shrink a tumor so it can be removed. For most patients, chemotherapy targeted to specific organs or tumor cells is the recognized treatment to control stage IV colon cancer. Radiation treatments may be used to help shrink a tumor and relieve pain. This is not a cure, but rather is intended to make you more comfortable. Complementary/Alternative Treatments You will hear and read about complementary/alternative treatments for cancer.

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Rectal Cancer Rate Increasing in Young Adults

Siegel, M.P.H., looked at trends in colorectal cancer incidence rates between 1992 and 2005 among young adults (ages 20 to 49) by sex, race/ethnicity, age, stage at diagnosis, and anatomic subsite. The study found that among individuals ages 20 to 49, incidence rates of colorectal cancer increased 1.5 percent per year in men and 1.6 percent per year in women from 1992 to 2005. Among non-Hispanic Whites, rates increased for both men and women in each 10-year age grouping (20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years) and for every stage of diagnosis. They found the largest annual percent increase in colorectal cancer incidence was in the youngest age group (20-29 years), in whom incidence rates rose by 5.2% per year in men and 5.6% per year in women. They say the rises are due to an increase in left-sided tumors, particularly in the rectum. The researchers address several possibilities for the rise, including rising rates of obesity, which is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer. Dietary factors may also come into play. The researchers note that between the late 1970s and the mid-1990s, fast-food consumption in the United States increased 5-fold among children and 3-fold among adults. A diet high in fast food is associated with both greater meat consumption and reduced milk consumption. Increased consumption of red and processed meat has been shown to increase risk of cancers of the distal colon and rectum, while milk and calcium consumption have shown a protective effect against the subsites in which the rise in incidence was most prominent. They say it is plausible that the emergence of unfavorable dietary patterns in children and young adults over the past three decades may have contributed to the increase in CRC among young adults observed in the study. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. For further information, please contact the source cited above. Journal Reference: Siegel et al.

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The study was published online in the journal Cancer. Read this story on http://www.medpagetoday.com . The SEER database includes population-based cancer registries covering roughly 26 percent of the U.S. population. Myer and colleagues searched data obtained between 1973 through 2005 for cancer in individuals under age 40. Roughly half of the cases found were in those aged 35 to 39; roughly three quarters of the patients were white. The incidence of colon cancer excluding the rectum was stable at 1.11 per 100,000 over this period. Rectal cancer occurred at a rate of 0.42 per 100,000 over the study period, but rose at a rate of 2.6 percent per year. Cancer of the rectosigmoid junction before age 40 was even less common with an incidence of 0.13 per 100,000, but also 2.2 percent per year. Together, rectal and rectosigmoid cancers appeared to have started to climb in incidence starting in 1984. The rate of increase was identical between males and females and was seen in both black and white populations. Although uncommon, cancer of the rectum and anus gained significant attention with the death of American actress Farrah Fawcett in 2009 after a three-year battle with anal cancer. Anal cancer is rare compared to rectal cancer; the American Cancer Society estimates 39,670 new cases of rectal cancer and 5,260 new cases of anal cancer in 2010. Current guidelines for colorectal cancer screening from the American College of Gastroenterology recommend that screening begin at age 50 for average-risk individuals and at age 45 years for African Americans, who are at higher risk. An earlier start for screening is suggested only for those with a positive family history of colorectal cancer or certain types of polyps.

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Patient Comments: Colon Cancer – Symptoms

Symptom Checker: Your Guide to Symptoms & Signs: Pinpoint Your Pain

Most colon cancers develop from a polyp in the lining of the colon, according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Depending on the site of the cancer in the colon, a tumor may grow several years before detection, which is why routine screening is important. Changes in Bowel Habits Changes in bowel habits are the most common symptoms in both early and advanced colon cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. Constipation with less than three bowel movements a week, diarrhea with loose bowel movements three times a day lasting more than three days, or constipation alternating with diarrhea are common advanced colon cancer symptoms. Diarrhea may also lead to dehydration when too much fluid is lost in the body. Pain and discomfort may accompany both constipation and diarrhea. If bowel habits do not become regular after over-the-counter treatments, increased fluids and increased fiber, contact the doctor. You Might Also Like Are There Herbal Bowel Obstruction According to the National Cancer Institute, colon cancer is a common cause of bowel obstruction that occurs when the tumor grows large enough to block the passage of waste materials. Motility, or the ability of the colon to push wastes out, may be limited if the tumor grows large enough to interfere with nerves. Not having a bowel movement or having very small bowel movements for a period of weeks, pain in the lower part of the abdomen, a swollen or distended abdomen, and vomiting may all indicate a bowel obstruction according to the National Cancer Institute. Pencil sized or ribbon like bowel movements may develop when the growing tumor mechanically blocks the colon and reshapes the stool. Bowel obstructions may be life threatening if not treated promptly. Bleeding and Anemia Colon cancer can cause bleeding that is bright or dark red, according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Bright red blood indicates current bleeding and dark red is usually seen with old blood that has been in the colon for a while.

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I went to the doctor and she submitted me the same day for a CT scan followed by a colonoscopy a couple of days later. CT scan showed a shadow on my liver and colonoscopy revealed a malignant growth in my rectum a cancerous polyp in the colon. Followed by another CT scan and eventually a PET scan the diagnosis was stage 4 metastatic colon cancer that has spread to the liver. 2nd opinion at City of Hope came to the same conclusion. I was told it had spread only to the liver. It did not spread to the lings or to any lymph nodes or anywhere else. Was this comment helpful? My doctor doesn’t tell me much but I have no appetite, nausea, and constant pain. We started on a mushy vegetable mostly diet, our dog has cancer too, so we all eat mushy veg/fruit/fish/diets with protein from meat for the dogs, fish, chicken for us. We eat 2 cups of soft boiled cauliflower; I boil it in chicken broth. We eat very little prepared foods, lots of brown rice. Slowly I am getting more energy and less pain. My symptoms were there for years but the doctors kept ignoring them, telling me I had irritable bowel, etc, until they found tumors in the center of my liver. But that was several years ago and I’m still here, lots of pain and lots of sleeping, no energy, rarely leave the house, but now with the new diet I have more energy, so maybe this will give others hope. Food really matters and if I can even eat this new mushy diet, maybe others can benefit too. Please give it a try.

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